Famous Authors’ Favorite Books

1. ERNEST HEMINGWAY

Papa Hemingway once said “there is no friend as loyal as a book,” and in a 1935 piece published in Esquire, he laid out a list of a few friends he said he would “rather read again for the first time … than have an assured income of a million dollars a year.” They included, he wrote, “Anna Karenina, Far Away and Long Ago, Buddenbrooks, Wuthering Heights, Madame Bovary, War and Peace, A Sportsman’s Sketches, The Brothers Karamazov, Hail and Farewell, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Winesburg, Ohio, La Reine Margot, The Maison Tellier, Le Rouge et le Noir, La Chartreuse de Parme, Dubliners, Yeats’s Autobiographies, and a few others.”

It wasn’t the first reading list he’d made; just a year earlier, Hemingway had dashed off a list of 14 books for an aspiring writer who had hitchhiked to Florida to meet him. It included a few of the same books above, plus two short stories by Stephen Crane.

2. JOAN DIDION

In an interview with The Paris Review in 2006, novelist and creative nonfiction scribe Joan Didion called Joseph Conrad’s Victory “maybe my favorite book in the world … I have never started a novel … without rereading Victory. It opens up the possibilities of a novel. It makes it seem worth doing.”

3. RAY BRADBURY

Sci-fi author Ray Bradbury’s favorite books, which he discussed during a 2003 interview with Barnes & Noble when he was 83, are somewhat unexpected. Among them, Bradbury said, were “The collected essays of George Bernard Shaw, which contain all of the intelligence of humanity during the last hundred years and perhaps more,” books written by Loren Eisley, “who is our greatest poet/essayist of the last 40 years,” and Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick: “Quite obviously its impact on my life has lasted for more than 50 years.”

The books that most influenced his career—and are presumably favorites as well—were those in Edgar Rice Burroughs’s John Carter: Warlord of Mars series. “[They] entered my life when I was 10 and caused me to go out on the lawns of summer, put up my hands, and ask for Mars to take me home,” Bradbury said. “Within a short time I began to write and have continued that process ever since, all because of Mr. Burroughs.”

4. GEORGE R.R. MARTIN

It’s probably not surprising that Game of Thrones author George R.R. Martin has said that J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, which he first read in junior high, is “still a book I admire vastly.” But he recently found inspiration in a newer book, which he recommended in a Live Journal entry: “I won’t soon forget Station Eleven,” he wrote. Emily St. John Mandel’s book about a group of actors in a recently post-apocalyptic society, he said, is “a deeply melancholy novel, but beautifully written, and wonderfully elegiac … a book that I will long remember, and return to.”

5. AYN RAND

“The very best I’ve ever read, my favorite thing in all world literature (and that includes all the heavy classics) is a novelette called Calumet K by Merwin-Webster,” Rand wrote in 1945. The book was famous then, but if you haven’t heard of it, allow Chicago magazine to outline the plot: “Calumet K is a quaint, endearingly Midwestern novel about the building of a grain elevator … It’s a procedural about large-scale agricultural production.”

6. GILLIAN FLYNN

When Gone Girl author Gillian Flynn was asked about her favorite books in a 2014 Reddit AMA, she called out her “comfort food” books—the kind “you grab when you’re feeling cranky and nothing sounds good to read”—which included Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None and Norman Mailer’s The Executioner’s Song.

7. VLADIMIR NABOKOV

During an interview with a French television station in the 1950s, the Lolita author—who wrote all of his own books on note cards, which were “gradually copied, expanded, and rearranged until they [became his novels],” according to The Paris Review—shared a list of what he considered to be great literature: James Joyce’s Ulysses, Kafka’s The Metamorphosis, Andrei Bely’s Petersburg, and “the first half of Proust’s fairy tale, In Search of Lost Time.”